Monday, June 18, 2007

Back To The Roots

I have re-discoverd a training method of the very beginning of my chess life: son against father. Now I am the father, and my son's playing strength is considerably lower than mine, therefore I give him the odds of a knight. Of course, as odds-giver, I am always White, and this position frequently arises on the board.

diagram

White to move.

In earlier games I used to launch a queenside pawn attack on his bishop and knight and often got my piece back. But as he improved his game, I began to lose with such a strategy. This is a wonderful thing: In handicap games, the stronger player has an equal opportunity to learn and to improve as the weaker player. My son is improving on his level, I am improving on mine. I started with a winning streak, losing now and then. Meanwhile I have to fight hard for every win, and often I only get a draw, and the losses become more frequent.

I must say, this is much more fun than CTS. Back to the position: The best plan for White is of course Bg5 to pin the knight and doing everything to make d3-d4 possible the sooner the better.

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2 Comments:

At 12:22 AM, Blogger transformation said...

would you be willing to email directly? i have an article i just sent bdk, tempo, et. al. that you will greatly enjoy? you will love it. it is perfect for some things you were interested in--i.e. GM Ram, etc.

dk_experiment

at

yahoo

dot

the usual business suffix.

warmly, david

 
At 5:02 AM, Blogger Jack Le Moine said...

I’m sorry I have to contact you like this but I can find no other way to contact you.
--------------------

Announcing the first ever Chess Blog Carnival to be held on September 1, 2007 at my blog.

There are now thousands of carnivals on the web. Almost every area of interest has its own carnival. Except for chess blogs. Until now.

The advantages of having a chess carnival: (1) For bloggers – to showcase a sample of their work to the chess community; (2) For readers – to sample content from a wide variety of chess blogs in one place. A Chess Blog Carnival will also encourage quality work. If a blogger knows that his piece is being showcased right alongside pieces from the other blogs, then that serves as a motivator right there.

I don’t mean to be presumptuous in doing this. I just know that instead of complaining about nobody doing something, pointing fingers, and endless discussing, sometimes it’s best that someone just steps up and gets the ball rolling. That’s what I’m doing. If someone else wants to take over, then that would be fine with me. In fact, I need all the help on this that I can get.

First, hosting. The successful carnivals rotate blog hosts from month to month.

Second, publicity. The successful carnivals have a number of blogs who post an announcement on the upcoming carnival on their blogs and keep doing so each month.

Third, participation. Successful carnivals have a large sample of work from their blogging communities. Note here, bloggers don’t do any additional work. A carnival is not for original pieces written just for the carnival. A carnival is for work that has already been posted onto the blog.

I’ll try to contact as many blogs this weekend as possible. I’d like the initial roll-out of this venture to be as high quality as possible. Once people see what a chess carnival can look like, then they can have a better idea of what this is all about. Please help!

Here the link for further information on this:
http://blogcarnival.com/bc/cprof_2250.html
That page includes a link to submit a post from your blog for inclusion in the carnival.

Jack Le Moine
jacklemoine.blogspot.com

 

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